Using an in-vitro biofilm model to assess the virulence potential of bacterial vaginosis or non-bacterial vaginosis Gardnerella vaginalis isolates. | - CCMAR -

Journal Article

TitleUsing an in-vitro biofilm model to assess the virulence potential of bacterial vaginosis or non-bacterial vaginosis Gardnerella vaginalis isolates.
Publication TypeJournal Article
AuthorsCastro, J
Secondary AuthorsAlves, P, Sousa, C, Cereija, T, França, Â
Tertiary AuthorsJefferson, KK
Corporate AuthorsCerca, Nuno
Year of Publication2015
JournalSci Rep
Volume5
Date Published2015 Jun 26
Pagination11640
ISSN2045-2322
KeywordsAdult, Aged, Antibiosis, Bacterial Adhesion, Bacterial Proteins, Bacterial Toxins, Biofilms, Female, Gardnerella vaginalis, Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial, HeLa Cells, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Humans, Lactobacillus, Microbial Sensitivity Tests, Middle Aged, Molecular Sequence Data, Neuraminidase, RNA, Ribosomal, 16S, Sequence Analysis, DNA, Species Specificity, Vagina, Vaginosis, Bacterial, Virulence, Young Adult
Abstract

Gardnerella vaginalis is the most common species found in bacterial vaginosis (BV). However, it is also present in a significant proportion of healthy women and G. vaginalis vaginal colonization does not always lead to BV. In an effort to better understand the differences between G. vaginalis isolated from women with a positive (BV) versus a negative (non-BV) diagnosis of BV, we compared the virulence potential of 7 BV and 7 non-BV G. vaginalis isolates and assessed the virulence factors related to biofilm formation, namely: initial adhesion and cytotoxic effect, biofilm accumulation, susceptibility to antibiotics, and transcript levels of the known vaginolysin, and sialidase genes. Furthermore, we also determined the ability of G. vaginalis to displace lactobacilli previously adhered to HeLa cells. Our results showed that non-BV strains were less virulent than BV strains, as suggested by the lower cytotoxicity and initial adhesion to Hela cells. Significant differences in expression of known virulence genes were also detected, further suggesting a higher virulence potential of the BV associated G. vaginalis. Importantly, we demonstrated that BV associated G. vaginalis were able to displace pre-coated vaginal protective lactobacilli and we hypothesize this to be a trigger for BV development.

DOI10.1038/srep11640
Sapientia

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26113465?dopt=Abstract

Alternate JournalSci Rep
PubMed ID26113465
PubMed Central IDPMC4481526
Grant ListP60 MD002256 / MD / NIMHD NIH HHS / United States
U54 HD080784 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
CCMAR Authors