Responses of seagrass to anthropogenic and natural disturbances do not equally translate to its consumers. | CCMAR
CCMAR é o único parceiro português em dois projetos europeus de Aquacultura
O Centro de Ciências do Mar (CCMAR) é parceiro em dois grandes projetos, financiados pela União Europeia, através de fundos H2020, o PerformFISH e o MedAID. Ambos os projetos serão desenvolvidos por equipas do CCMAR, durante os próximos anos.
SIBIC2018
VII Congress of the Iberian Society for Ichthyology, Faro, Portugal, from the 12th to the 16th of June, 2018. REGISTER NOW
Aquaexcel2020 - The 8th Call for Access is OPEN
The 8th Call for Access is OPEN, with an application deadline of 12 December 2017.
TítuloResponses of seagrass to anthropogenic and natural disturbances do not equally translate to its consumers.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsTomas, F, Martínez-Crego, B, Hernán, G, Santos, R
JournalGlob Chang Biol
Volume21
Questão11
Pagination4021-30
Date Published2015 Nov
ISSN1365-2486
Palavras-chaveAlismatidae, Animals, Carbon Dioxide, Eutrophication, Food Chain, Herbivory, Invertebrates, Portugal
Abstract

Coastal communities are under threat from many and often co-occurring local (e.g., pollution, eutrophication) and global stressors (e.g., climate change), yet understanding the interactive and cumulative impacts of multiple stressors in ecosystem function is far from being accomplished. Ecological redundancy may be key for ecosystem resilience, but there are still many gaps in our understanding of interspecific differences within a functional group, particularly regarding response diversity, that is, whether members of a functional group respond equally or differently to anthropogenic stressors. Herbivores are critical in determining plant community structure and the transfer of energy up the food web. Human disturbances may alter the ecological role of herbivory by modifying the defense strategies of plants and thus the feeding patterns and performance of herbivores. We conducted a suite of experiments to examine the independent and interactive effects of anthropogenic (nutrient and CO2 additions) and natural (simulated herbivory) disturbances on a seagrass and its interaction with two common generalist consumers to understand how multiple disturbances can impact both a foundation species and a key ecological function (herbivory) and to assess the potential existence of response diversity to anthropogenic and natural changes in these systems. While all three disturbances modified seagrass defense traits, there were contrasting responses of herbivores to such plant changes. Both CO2 and nutrient additions influenced herbivore feeding behavior, yet while sea urchins preferred nutrient-enriched seagrass tissue (regardless of other experimental treatments), isopods were deterred by these same plant tissues. In contrast, carbon enrichment deterred sea urchins and attracted isopods, while simulated herbivory only influenced isopod feeding choice. These contrasting responses of herbivores to disturbance-induced changes in seagrass help to better understand the ecological functioning of seagrass ecosystems in the face of human disturbances and may have important implications regarding the resilience and conservation of these threatened ecosystems.

DOI10.1111/gcb.13024
Sapientia

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26152761?dopt=Abstract

Alternate JournalGlob Chang Biol
PubMed ID26152761
Source